Klang Cendol @ Klang

18 05 2011

When I was told that the best Cendol is found in old Klang town, the statement was met with skepticism by yours truly. However, curiosity got the better of me and I decided to make a trip down to the ‘royal city’ just to find out if the cendol lives up to its reputation. Upon seeing the cendol shop, I was startled to see the word 1972 prominently displayed on the signboard. Apparently, the cendol shop was founded by Mr. Mahalingam way back in 1972.

There is an interesting story of how Mr. Mahalingam began his cendol business. He came from a very poor family and had no choice but to pawn his Seiko watch for $20 to start a part-time cendol business at Nibong Tebal in Penang. His first day profit was only $1.60 but his persistency paid off when he was offered to take over a business from another cendol seller in Klang when the later need to go back to India. The rest as they say is history.

There are many types of cendol sold at Klang Cendol ranging from cendol biasa (plain cendol), cendol ais krim and cendol pulut (cendol with glutinous  rice). I ordered the cendol pulut which costs RM 2.20 per bowl.

The cendol was served in a metal bowl. Instead of a mountain of shaved ice covered with coconut milk and thick gula melaka (palm sugar), the bowl of cendol came with a few chunks of glutinous rice in a pool of melted ice with brownish gula melaka, milk, green jelly and red beans.

While it doesn’t look impressive, the taste was truly fantastic. While it wasn’t overly dense with gula melaka which made it less sweeter than those Baba cendol in Melaka, it still hit all the right notes with a perfect combination of fresh coconut milk with gula melaka.

I believe Mr. Mahalingam has fine-tuned his recipe over the years and has successfully come up with a lips smacking bowl of cendol that truly lives up to his reputation.

It was also my first time trying cendol pulut which adds a new dimension to the texture of the dessert. While cendol biasa comes mainly with shaved ice, the cendol pulut has a more chewy texture due to the glutinous rice soaked in the coconut milk. Two thumbs up!

Apparently, Cendol Klang do sell rojak as well. The sauce is slightly lighter in colour and not as thick or as spicy as those other mamak stalls.

There were fried tofu, a piece of boiled egg, sliced cucumber and even lettuce.

Taste wise, I wasn’t really impressed with it. After tasting the cendol, I was hoping that the rojak would be equally good but I still prefer Rojak Mustaffa at Petaling Jaya.

But the whole purpose of going there was to taste the cendol and I wasn’t disappointed at all. True enough, apart from Bak Kut Teh and seafood, Klang can proudly proclaim cendol as one its repertoire of signature dishes in this royal town.

Cendol Klang
No, 78, Jalan Nanas
41400 Klang
Selangor Darul Ehsan

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Pasar Besar Wakaf Bharu @ Kelantan #2

13 02 2011

Every Friday, Wakaf Bharu becomes crowded as stalls are lined up along the street of the famous “Friday Market” near ‘Pasar Besar Wakaf Bharu’. Apart from the street market, the town is also well known for its morning market which is buzzing with activities during the day.

1. Fresh vegetables are sold in the morning market. Most of these vegetables are home grown by the sellers themselves at their kampung (village).

2. Stack of cucumbers sold at the market place. These cucumbers are free from pesticides as they are all homegrown.

3. A Malay woman was seen selling ‘Kacang Kuda Rebus’ or Boiled Chickpeas. These beans are soaked in the water overnight before being cooked in boiled water.

4. An unusual sight of fried red rice vermicelli at the market.

5. An old woman sitting behind heaps of fresh vegetables. The four-angled beans were tied with rubber band as can be seen in the picture.

6. ‘Mee rojak’ or rojak noodles were nicely packed and arranged on top of the metal tray for morning consumption. These noodles are accompanied with thick peanut sauce which is sweeter than the common rojak found elsewhere.

7. ‘Pulut pagi’ is a popular breakfast snack in Kelantan. These glutinous rice are cooked with brown sugar and is eaten with coconut flakes and boiled beans.

8. The thick stems of ‘Kai Lan’ or Chinese broccoli provide an interesting composition to shoot from top view. These vegetables are tied together with rubber bands.

9. Fresh vegetable salad with beautiful hues of green under natural light.

10. Another woman selling a variety of vegetables.

11. ‘Ketupat palas’ or glutinous rice wrapped in triangular shaped fan palm leaves is another unique offering only found in Kelantan. It is commonly eat with chicken or beef rendang.

12. Fresh gingers and other vegetables as sold in the market.

13. A combination of green and white chendol nicely packed in plastic bags.

14. A view of the bustling Wakaf Bharu morning market from afar.





Pan Mee @ Kum Chuan Coffee Shop

19 05 2010

I had a nice lunch with my colleagues at Kum Chuan coffee shop today. Situated near to 3K Sports Complex, this restaurant is usually packed with customers during noon. I was told that the Pan Mee stall here is pretty good and hence, I ordered a bowl to try.

While waiting for the noodle to arrive, I noticed that there were many customers eating Penang Fruit Rojak. Not wanting to be left out, I decided to order a small plate of Rojak as well. What makes this rojak different from the usual ones is the inclusion of dried cuttlefish to give a sweet and salty taste to the dish. I must say, at RM 4 per plate it was something different and definitely worth a try!

The Pan Mee (RM4.30) came shortly after that. There ingredients consists of mince pork, fried anchovies, vegetables and black fungus.

The noodle has a springy texture while the soup was free from MSG flavouring. This is one of the better Pan Mee I have tried so far.

Although the restaurant can be quite hot in the afternoon, the cheap food makes it all worthwhile.

Kedai Kopi & Makanan Kum Chuan
Jalan SS13/1 (Beside A&W Restaurant)
Persiaran Kewajipan
47500 Subang Jaya
Selangor Darul Ehsan

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